Investing Answers Building and Protecting Your Wealth through Education Publisher of The Next Banks That Could Fail
Investing Answers Building and Protecting Your Wealth through Education Publisher of The Next Banks That Could Fail

Long-Term Debt

What it is:

Long-term debt is debt due in one year or more. Long-term debt appears on a company's balance sheet.

How it works (Example):

Let's assume Company XYZ borrowed $12 million from the bank and now must repay $100,000 of the loan every month for the next 10 years. Here is Company XYZ's balance sheet before borrowing the $12 million:

Note that $1.2 million (12 months x $100,000 principal repayment) of the $12 million is classified as a current liability, because this amount is due within one year. The remaining $10,800,000 ($12,000,000 - $1,200,000) is classified as long-term debt.

A company's long-term debts are ranked on the balance sheet in the order they will be repaid if the company is liquidated. A company must record the market value of its long-term debt on the balance sheet, which is the amount necessary to pay off the debt as of the date of the balance sheet.

Don't confuse long-term debt with total debt, which includes debt due in less than one year.

Why it Matters:

Analysts evaluate a company's long-term debt to see how much leverage a company has and how solvent the company is. In general, long-term debt can help a company magnify its financial success, but the burden of principal and interest payments may become too heavy for companies that borrow excessively.

Interest rate changes can motivate companies to repay long-term debt before it is actually due. If a company notices that interest rates have fallen below the rate the company is currently paying on its debt, the company may choose to pay off the high-rate debt with new, lower-rate debt.

It is important to read the notes to financial statements when studying a company's long-term debt. Debt terms and requirements vary widely from company to company. Comparison of long-term debt amounts is generally most meaningful among companies within the same industry, and the definition of a "high" or "low" amount of debt should be made within this context.

Related Terms View All
  • Making Home Affordable
    The Making Home Affordable program is actually a collection of several programs: Home...
  • Y2K
    In the business world, Y2K (also called the millennium bug) was a problem that plagued...
  • Spot Secondary
    A spot secondary is generally a transaction with just one type of holder -- usually...
  • Married Filing Jointly
    Let's say John and Jane Doe are married. They sit down to file their tax returns for the...
  • Government Accounting Office (GAO)
    The head of the GAO is the Comptroller General of the United States. Congress creates a...